Interview with Samuel: Youth can help achieve SDGs

In 2015, Samuel Malinga, at age 26, founded Sanitation Africa—a company engaged in turning human waste into briquettes for cooking and agricultural manure. For his innovative approach to waste management, Samuel has been recognized by several organizations, including the Tony Elumelu Foundation, a philanthropy that awarded him a grant to expand his operations. In 2014, Ventures Africa, a business and lifestyle publication, listed him as one of the 40 African innovators to watch. While visiting the United Nations headquarters in New York recently, Samuel shared his experiences with Africa Renewal’s Kingsley Ighobor

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Interview with Samar: Youth still under-represented in leadership

Twenty-eight-year-old Samar Samir Mezghanni, a Tunisian Iraqi, is one of the 17 United Nations young leaders for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), who have been chosen to engage their peers in implementing the SDGs. She has written stories for children on the SDGs and garnered two world records from Guinness, first at the age of 12, when she was declared “the world’s youngest writer”; then at 14, when she was declared “the youngest most prolific writer in the world.” In this interview with Africa Renewal’s Franck Kuwonu, Samar talks about her work to make the SDGs more accessible to youth, and the challenges and hopes of young people in Tunisia.

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Interview with Rita: Linking smallholder farmers to banks

Rita Kimani, 25, is one of the young leaders designated by the United Nations to help promote the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) among fellow youth. Through her initiative, FarmDrive, Rita is using data analytics and mobile phone technology to connect smallholder farmers with lending institutions in rural Kenya. She spoke to Africa Renewal’s Zipporah Musau about her project.

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Accessibility in Cities

There are approximately one billion people worldwide living with disabilities, and by 2050 it is predicted that 66% of the world population will be living in cities. This will undoubtedly mean there will be a significant increase in the number of people with disabilities globally living in cities and needing to access their transport, facilities, and much more. However, many cities do not provide adequate access for people with disabilities. This is a problem for a multitude of reasons, including poor urban planning, lack of awareness of the issue, and a lack of governmental regulation.

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